Posters

This page contains the titles and 1st authors of all posters that will be presented at the conference. The full abstracts and author information are included in the abstract book.

 – Click here for the complete SIPS 2019 abstract book – 

Poster Session 1. Sunday, July 7, 6:00 PM – 7.30 PM

1.01 – Christoph Werner – The development and evaluation of a new model of an active placebo

1.02 – Kelly Clemens – Momentary mood as a moderator of verbally-induced placebo analgesia in an experimental pain paradigm

1.03 – Damien Boorman – Serotonergic neurons in the rostral midline medulla are activated by placebo-induced analgesia in rats with chronic neuropathic pain

1.04 – Karina Hansen – Active effects and placebo effects of a mindfulness based psychological intervention

1.05 – Annelie Göhler – Relieving sad mood – Can a placebo be of help?

1.06 – Arran Davis – Ergogenic placebo and social support effects on muscle work and fatigue in an fMRI-compatible experiment

1.07 – Sean Zion – Leveraging patient mindsets to harness the clinical utility of the placebo effect in modern medicine

1.08 – Aleksandrina Skvortsova – Can oxytocin influence placebo and nocebo effects?

1.09 – Yiqi Pan – Minimizing drug adverse events by informing about the nocebo effect – An experimental proof-of-concept study with headache patients

1.10 – Antje Frey Nascimento – Open-label placebo treatment for women suffering from premenstrual syndrome: Study protocol and first results of a randomized controlled trial

Poster Session 2. Monday, July 8, 1:00 PM – 2.00 PM

2.01 – Elisabeth Olliges – Open-label placebos for elderly patients with chronic knee pain: Effects on pain, functionality, and quality of life

2.02 – Giacomo Rossettini – Knowledge of contextual factors, placebo and nocebo effects in patients with musculoskeletal pain: A national survey

2.03 – Alvisa Palese – Knowledge, beliefs, use, and ethical and communicational issues of placebo and nocebo effects among nursing students: A national survey

2.04 – Marco Testa – Contextual factors triggering placebo and nocebo effects in Italian nursing practice: A national cross-sectional study

2.05 – Lotte van Dillen – A taste of the (un)expected

2.06 – Seetal Dodd – Incidence and characteristics of the nocebo response from meta-analyses of the placebo arms of clinical trials

2.07 – Alexandra Kern – The influence of personality traits on the placebo/nocebo response: A systematic review

2.08 – Solene Frileux – The placebo diet: How suggestion affects cognitive regulation, and through it hunger perception

2.09 – Michael Schaefer – Open-label placebos improve test anxiety and self-management abilities and resources

2.10 – Paul Dieppe – Therapeutic landscapes and atmospheres: Important components of context effects in healthcare

2.11 – Anne Schienle – Placebo effects in spider phobia: An eye-tracking experiment

2.12 – Alexander Winkler – Placebo- and nocebo- effects in cognitive neuroenhancement: Expectation affects perceived but not actual cognitive performance

2.13 – Rosanne Smits – The role of placebo effects in immune-related conditions: Mechanisms and clinical considerations

2.14 – Elisa Kamper-Fuhrmann – Investigating placebo responses in preschoolers (≤ 6 y): Challenging but possible?

2.15 – Regula Neuenschwander – Investigating parents’ approaches of how to shape their children’s mind: A pilot study on harnessing placebo effects in day-to-day life

2.16 – Kirsten Barnes – I’m trying to tell you: Open label placebo effects in GVS and VR-induced nausea

2.17 – Sarah Theiss – An exploration of the role of context effects in acupuncture practice: A qualitative study based on semi-structured interviews with acupuncturists in private practice in three different locations

2.18 – Julia Schmitz – Positive treatment expectancies reduce clinical pain and perceived motor disability despite increased pain experience: A randomized controlled trial on sham opioid infusion in patients with chronic back pain

2.19 – Jianyou Guo – An animal model of placebo analgesia in inflammatory pain rats

2.20 – Uri Nitzan – Open-label placebo for the treatment of depression – A randomized controlled trial

2.21 – Younbyoung Chae – How placebo needles differ from placebo pills?

2.22 – Anne-Kathrin Bräscher – Aiming for placebo and (partly) observing nocebo: A pilot study on open-label placebo

2.23 – Amelia Scott – The blind leading the not-so-blind: A meta-analysis of blinding in pharmacological trials for chronic pain

2.24 – Sandhya Ravikumar – The placebo response in migraine treatment trials: Comparing oral preventives, botulinum toxin, and anti-CGRP treatments

2.25 – Victoria Bridgland – Expecting the worst: Investigating the effects of trigger warnings on reactions to ambiguously themed photos

2.26 – Sophie Kjær – The role of expectations in placebo analgesia: A meta-analysis

2.27 – Roel Gaymans – Selfhealing and the placebo effect

2.28 – Thilo Friehs – How to administer deceptive and open-label placebos? A five-armed experimental study on sadness

2.29 – Elżbieta Bajcar – Do we learn pain better from people like us? Observational learning in inducing placebo analgesia

2.30 – Bernardo Villa-Sánchez – Positive verbal suggestions optimize postural control

2.31 – Ewa Buglewicz – Is pain contagious? The effect of observation on pain induction and its influence on placebo studies

2.32 – Liesbeth van Vliet – The use of empathy and expectancy manipulations to counter nocebo-effects of information provision in palliative cancer care; An observational study of clinician-patient consultations

2.33 – Jarry Porsius – Factors influencing patient outcome expectations in daily clinical practice

2.34 – Helen Köchlin – Common factors in the treatment of chronic primary pain in children and adolescents: Protocol for a network meta-analysis

2.35 – Jens Hamberger – Placebo economics – The economic potential of utilizing the placebo effect in drug therapy

2.36 – Daniela Schelski – Marketing placebo effects on taste perception are not related to the level of trust in marketers and not affected by oxytocin

2.37 – Lisa D’Astolfo – No1likesu – An experimental paradigm to investigate social expectations and their adjustment

2.38 – Carmen Jacob – Prediction of placebo responsiveness in motion sickness by the cognitive reflection test – Are placebo responders more intuitive?

2.39 – Eleonora Maria Camerone – The time component of expectation in placebo analgesia

2.40 – Nathan Huneke – Belief about group allocation predicts placebo response in the 7.5% carbon dioxide inhalational model of anxiety

2.41 – Lemmy Schakel – Can verbal suggestions strengthen the effects of a relaxation intervention?

2.42 – Mariève Cyr – Inducing placebo psychedelic experiences by manipulating contextual factors

2.43 – Johannes Laferton – Expectation effects on surgery outcome in hip and knee arthroplasty: A meta-analysis

2.44 – Marta Ceko – Predicting placebo analgesia – New approaches combining personality, brain and genetics in large-scale samples

2.45 – Stefanie Meeuwis – Can placebo effects be learned for histamine-induced itch? Conditioning the effects of antihistamines

2.46 – Cláudia Carvalho – Open label placebo in chronic low back pain: A follow up study

2.47 – Merve Karacaoglu – Nocebo effects on pressure pain: Their induction and reduction via learning

2.48 – Judith Tekampe – Randomized controlled trial on conditioning cortisol and its psychophysiological effects

2.49 – Meriem Manaï – The role of conditioning for pharmacological treatments in rheumatoid arthritis: A pilot study

2.50 – Heike Gerger – Hospital clowning – A psychological placebo intervention?

2.51 – Joseph Blythe – Manipulating NMDA-dependent learning to alter nocebo effects on itch: Experimental design

Poster Session 3. Tuesday, July 9, 1:00 PM – 2.00 PM

3.01 – Paul Dieppe – Do placebos cause an aggravation response?

3.02 – Karolina Wiercioch-Kuzianik – Placebo analgesia: The interplay between classical conditioning and verbal suggestions. Results from a comprehensive, multi-group study

3.03 – Efrat Czerniak – Placebo by proxy: Parent’s role in child’s medical treatment

3.04 – Elisa Frisaldi – The placebo response in myasthenia gravis: A meta-analysis

3.05 – Valentin Panayotov – Studying a possible placebo effect of an imaginary low-calorie diet

3.06 – LingLing Weng – Do placebo and nocebo effects generalize across somatosensory sensations?

3.07 – Meike Shedden-Mora – The Treatment Expectation Questionnaire (TEX-Q) – A generic multidimensional scale measuring patients’ treatment expectations

3.08 – Dominika Farley – Nocebo hyperalgesia: The interplay between classical conditioning and verbal suggestions. Results from a comprehensive, multi-group study

3.09 – Philip Hurst – An educational placebo effect intervention reduces the likelihood of athletes using performance enhancing drugs

3.10 – Ryan van Nood – Faces and masks of the placebo effect: Open-label placebos and the mind-body problem

3.11 – Cora Wagner – Animal-assisted placebo intervention: Can the presence of a dog affect placebo analgesia?

3.12 – Rosanne Smits – Explaining the placebo effect: Does ‘Pavlov’ ring a bell?

3.13 – Simone Meijer – Counterconditioning as treatment for chronic pain symptoms: A study design

3.14 – Helena Bieniek – Does social status matter when it comes to learning pain from others? A study on observational learning in inducing placebo analgesia

3.15 – Fabian Wolters – Evoking placebo and nocebo effects on mental fatigue

3.16 – Roel van Dooren – Shifting the balance: The role of context in shaping metacontrol policies.

3.17 – Waclaw Adamczyk – Nocebo effect in experimental paraesthesia

3.18 – Yvonne Nestoriuc – Discontinuing antidepressants and antipsychotics: An online survey of consumers’ experiences and expectations

3.19 – Yang Wang – The influences of observational learning on pain perception and its neural correlates

3.20 – Liat Honigman – Pain reporting accuracy and the placebo response

3.21 – Ehab Matta – Can training aimed to increase pain-reporting accuracy diminish the placebo response?

3.22 – Julia Stuhlreyer – Patient–clinician relationship as an “add-on” to drugs?  Empathic clinician visits impacts the success of the perioperative pain therapy (RCT)

3.23 – Merve Karacaoglu – The role of nocebo effects in identifying patients at risk for pain sensitization in fibromyalgia: A study design

3.24 – Mia Thomaïdou – Neurophysiological underpinnings of nocebo hyperalgesia: Current findings and future directions.

3.25 – Titilola Akintola – Novel race effects on expectancy-induced analgesia in temporomandibular joint disorder

3.26 – Soyeon Cheon – Association of information disclosure on placebo control with blinding and trial outcomes – A case study of participant information leaflets of randomised placebo-controlled trials of acupuncture

3.27 – Felicity Braithwaite – Blinding in physical intervention research: A framework for sham development

3.28 – Joseph Blythe – Nocebo effects on cowhage-evoked itch: The role of conditioning and observational learning

3.29 – Nadja Heimgartner – Open/hidden administration of exposure training in spider phobia

3.30 – Dieuwke Veldhuijzen – The role of expectations in conditioned pain modulation

3.31 – Stefan Salzmann – Moderators and mediators of a preoperative psychological intervention aiming at improving heart surgery outcomes – the PSY-HEART I trial

3.32 – Alexandra Tinnermann – Does expectancy increase analgesia during opioid treatment?

3.33 – Marcel Wilhelm – Open-label placebo vs. conventional and alternative medicine – An online study on expected effectiveness

3.34 – Henriët van Middendorp – Expectancies as predictors of symptom improvement in patients with persistent symptoms attributed to Lyme disease

3.35 – Meriem Manaï – Conditioning the effects of a stress management intervention to a distinctive scent

3.36 – Kaitlyn Matthews – ‘At face value’: General practitioners’ attitudes toward placebos and open-label placebos

3.37 – Carmen-Édith Belleï-Rodriguez – Placebo effect and cognitive ability in children with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder

3.38 – Dilan Sezer – The role of expectancy and adherence on open-label placebo effects in premenstrual syndrome: Preliminary results of a randomized controlled trial

3.39 – Sarah Bürgler – Open-label placebo in premenstrual syndrome: Preliminary results of a randomized controlled trial on psychological distress, functional interference and health-related quality of life

3.40 – Philipp Reicherts – Placebo manipulations influence the effectiveness of pain regulation

3.41 – Huib van Dis – Statin intolerance: Biological toxicity or nocebo-effect?

3.42 – Danielle Bartels – Nocebo effects and scratching behaviour on itch

3.43 – Attila Szabo – Improved affect and physical wellbeing after only three minutes:  The power of an active- and a pure placebo pill

3.44 – Dhahyun Choi – Brain activations in the expectations of sensory experience for acupuncture stimulation

3.45 – Akbar Shabir – The influence of caffeine expectancies on simulated soccer performance

3.46 – Mette Sieg – Patient attitudes towards adverse event disclosure

3.47 – Stefanie Meeuwis – Open- and closed-label verbal suggestions regarding a sham transdermal caffeine patch: Effects on itch

3.48 – Justyna Brączyk – The self-confidence of a model – Can it modulate the strength of learning about pain? A study on placebo analgesia induced by observational learning.

3.49 – Michael Bernstein – Evaluating the feasibility of adjunctive open-placebos for acute pain: A pilot study

3.50 – Davide Anchisi – Order matters: Pain experience and expectation continuously shape perception

3.51 – Jonathan Ashar – Open-label placebo injection for chronic back pain:  A randomized controlled trial

3.52 – Elizabeth Olson – Sex influence on expectancy and placebo analgesia in chronic orofacial pain patients

3.53 – Felicity Bishop – A research protocol for empathy and expectation management for patients in primary care: Methods for developing a new digital intervention for practitioners